News

 COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) - Contractors are planning to start reconstruction of a runway at the Columbia Regional Airport, reflecting the increasing popularity of the largest airport in mid-Missouri.

   The airport will use an $11 million federal grant and transportation sales tax revenue to expand a secondary, crosswind runway to 5,500 feet from 4,400 feet. The project is expected to be done in late summer or early fall.

   ST. LOUIS (AP) - A new online-only high school in St. Louis is allowing at-risk students a chance to get their diplomas.

   St. Louis Public Radio  reports that Workforce High is operated jointly by St. Louis Public Schools and the city's job agency, St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (SLATE). It uses the same online curriculum as the district's three alternative schools and four credit-recovery programs. Twenty students are participating.

   ST. LOUIS (AP) - Missouri's 12 community college systems are working together to train students for jobs offered by the state's businesses.

   Leaders from the colleges signed an agreement Thursday to officially begin the Missouri Community College Workforce Development Network.

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports  the program will help in cases where a Missouri company needs assistance with employee training but the nearest community college doesn't have a curriculum or expert faculty in that subject.

   JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri's House budget leader says lawmakers might not have changed corporate tax law if they'd known what it would actually cost.

   Republican House Budget Committee Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick told The Associated Press that lawmakers had poor information when the 2015 bill came up for a vote.

   The measure was estimated to cost about $15 million annually. Corporate tax revenues dropped more than $155 million the first fiscal year it was implemented, though it's not clear whether that was all from the tax change.

   The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has released its first review of teacher education programs.

   St. Louis Public Radio’s Camille Phillips says the state review found that most colleges are doing a good job preparing Missouri educators.

   The vast majority of Missouri educator programs meet the state’s expectations.

   That’s based on the success of the about 15,000 teachers and principals certified in Missouri over the past five years. Success was measured by GPA, surveys and passing certification tests within two attempts.

   Jon Glaser picked up three All-America awards Thursday night – one on an individual basis by finishing fourth in the 200-yard freestyle and as part of two relay teams – as the Miners had scoring performances in three events at the NCAA Division II Swimming & Diving Championships. S&T sits in 19th place in the team standings at the midway point of the meet.

   COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) - Two women are facing kidnapping charges following a crash along Interstate 70 that injured three children in Missouri.

   The Columbia Daily Tribune  reports that 31-year-old Demetres Washington and 22-year-old Nia Boldridge were each indicted on three kidnapping counts Wednesday. The felony is punishable of 10 years to life in prison.

   The Missouri State Highway Patrol says three children were in the Pontiac Grand Prix that Washington was driving when the car crashed into another vehicle Tuesday.

   ST. LOUIS (AP) - Microsoft Corp. plans a regional office at the Cortex tech hub in St. Louis, bringing 150 jobs.

   The move, announced Wednesday, includes relocating about 60 employees from Microsoft's office in Creve Coeur, Missouri, a St. Louis suburb, to the new office when the $55 million facility opens in 2018.

   CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo. (AP) - Southeast Missouri State University is reporting 29 confirmed cases of mumps, and officials say the number is expected to grow.

   The Southeast Missourian  reports state health officials are recommending that students consider getting a third dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine.

   University official Bruce Skinner says the vaccination will help protect students from the viral infection and reduce the severity of symptoms for those who may have been exposed.

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - A Missouri environmental group says and the owner of a Kansas City amusement park have reached a federal lawsuit settlement over claims that the park illegal dumped pollutants into the Missouri River.

   Online court records show that a judge signed off on the deal between the Missouri Coalition for the Environment, Cedar Fair LP and its subsidiary Worlds of Fun LLC.

   JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri lawmakers are questioning the timing of administrators' response to claims of widespread harassment in state prisons.

   Outgoing Division of Adult Institutions Director Dave Dormire told a panel of House lawmakers Thursday that top officials met last summer to discuss the larger issue of complaints.

   But Republican Rep. Jim Hansen says problems in the department had been going on for years before that.

   KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - A class-action lawsuit says the lack of funding and staff for Missouri's public defender system has left overwhelmed public defenders unable to provide adequate defense for indigent clients.

   The ACLU of Missouri and the Roderick and Solange MacArthur Justice Center at St. Louis filed the lawsuit Thursday against Gov. Eric Greitens and several other officials.

   A bill that would keep Missouri cities from raising their minimum wage is headed to the state Senate.

   The measure passed by the House Thursday would undo St. Louis’ increase to 11-dollar-an-hour, which was recently upheld by the state Supreme Court. It would also block Kansas City’s efforts to raise theirs.

   Under the bill, no local government could have a minimum wage higher than the state’s, which is 7-dollars and 70 cents an hour. Republicans say it will protect small business owners from going bankrupt.

   A bill targeting crimes done by people who are in the US illegally is now in the hands of the Missouri House. The Senate’s revised legislation passed Thursday.

   The proposal makes it a crime for someone who had been deported to illegally re-enter the US, come to Missouri and commit “any dangerous felony.” But the Senate removed language that required local jailers to turn suspects over to federal immigration authorities as soon as possible. 

Democrat Jill Schupp says it’s still a bad bill that will eat up taxpayer dollars:

   JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The Missouri House has passed legislation backers say is aimed at stopping out-of-state plaintiffs from bringing lawsuits to the state.

   House members voted 100-54 Thursday to send the bill to the Senate.

   Lawmakers disagree about what the bill would do. Generally, it would limit plaintiffs' ability to combine lawsuits and require plaintiffs to individually establish a venue where a case is heard.

Missouri University of Science and Technology and other universities have been awarded a $225,000 grant in an effort to support women and other minority scientists as entrepreneurs.  S&T has partnered up with the University of Louisville and Indiana University to create a new program called Advancing Women And UnderRepresented Entrepreneurs: ACCelerating Entrepreneurial SucceSS, or for short, AWARE: ACCESS: Building Innovation Capacity through Diversity.

Growing Green

Mar 10, 2017

   Missouri S&T had two All-America performances on the opening night of the NCAA Division  II Swimming  & Diving Championships, as Jon Glaser  and Tim Samuelsen posted scoring marks in their respective events.  Glaser finished in 11th place in the 50-yard freestyle and Samuelsen finished in 15th place in the 1,000-yard freestyle.

   BLUFFTON, Ind. (AP) - A company that makes plastic shipping containers plans to close its northeastern Indiana factory, costing about 120 workers their jobs.

   Bluffton Mayor Ted Ellis says Buckhorn officials told him Monday the plant would close in the city about 20 miles south of Fort Wayne.

   He tells WANE-TV Buckhorn plans to consolidate its manufacturing operations at its Springfield, Missouri, plant.

   KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - The Missouri State Highway Patrol says Kansas City Chiefs tight end Demetrius Harris has been arrested on suspicion of felony possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

   The Kansas City Star reports that Harris was a passenger in a car stopped Tuesday on Interstate 49. He was taken to the Bates County Jail, where he was booked and released. He has not been charged.

   Patrol Sgt. Bill Lowe says the car was stopped for a traffic violation. He says a trooper smelled marijuana and found the drug on Harris.

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